Ex-hostage Joshua Boyle’s estranged wife expected to testify at his assault trial

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Ex-hostage Joshua Boyle’s estranged wife expected to testify at his assault trial

by - 2 min read

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Caitlan Coleman, the estranged spouse of former hostage Joshua Boyle, is expected to start testifying later today at Boyle’s criminal trial in Ottawa.

Boyle, 35, has pleaded not guilty to 19 charges, including assault with a weapon, sexual assault and forcible confinement. Coleman is the alleged victim for 17 of the offences.

He was charged a few months after the couple returned to Canada in October 2017 with the three children they had while in captivity for five years in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

On Tuesday, the trial heard Boyle called 911 late on the night of Dec. 30, 2017, to report his wife was missing and suicidal.

Listen to the 911 call below. The audio has been edited for length and to protect privacy.

Several hours after the 911 call, after police found and spoke to Coleman, Ottawa police arrested Boyle on Dec. 31, 2017.

Ontario Court Justice Peter Doody is presiding over the trial, which is set to resume Wednesday morning with the end of the defence team’s cross-examination of an Ottawa police officer who responded to the 911 call, and then the beginning of Coleman’s testimony.

Her time in the witness box is expected to take three days.

Joshua Boyle arrives for the start of his trial in Ottawa on Monday. The former hostage is charged with 19 counts, including assault and uttering a threat to cause death. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)

The 19 charges Boyle faces are:

  • One count of sexual assault while threatening to use a weapon (ropes).
  • One count of sexual assault with a weapon (ropes).
  • One count of uttering a threat to cause death.
  • Nine counts of assault.
  • One count of assault with a weapon (a broomstick).
  • Three counts of unlawful confinement.
  • One count of administering a noxious substance (the antidepressant Trazodone).
  • One count of public mischief (misleading a police officer into believing that someone was suicidal and missing, causing the officer to start an investigation, and thereby diverting suspicion away from Boyle).
  • One count of criminal harassment.

This story originally appeared on CBC

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